Archive for Cadets

OCS sees near-record number of cadet and Senior promotions

by C/Capt Elizabeth Nelson

The first Monday of every month at the Omaha Composite Squadron is a cause for celebration. On December 3rd, 2018, a total of 16 cadets and 2 senior members promoted, coming close to the record 19 who ranked up earlier in 2018 in one night. Nonetheless, it has been a record setting year.

Cadet promotions on December 3rd ranged from C/A1C to C/1stLt. It isn’t uncommon to see a wide difference in the progression of each cadet on ‘blues’ night.

C/1stLt Reid Sherman is no stranger to ranking up. He said that he always had an interest in flying, but with the military style environment in Civil Air Patrol, he just had to join.

“I was amazed at how far I had come in Civil Air Patrol, and I was able to look back at all that I had accomplished in the cadet program to get this far.  It’s a rare treat when you get to think about what it took for you to get where you are, and all the people that helped you on the way. I encourage all cadets to stop, just for a brief moment, and remember what it took to earn each accomplishment,” C/1stLt Sherman said.

C/SrA Ariana Bryant, who joined CAP after speaking with an Air Force Academy Liaison Officer, visited OCS once and knew it was for her.

“When I promoted, I was very happy. It is a recognition of the work that has been put in. Promoting means you are one step closer to achieving your goals. It is also a motivator to keep working to earn the next promotion,” C/SrA Bryant said.

 

The OCS Squadron Commander, Major John Pineda, cited the need for more cadet officers on the promotion packed Monday, and encouraged cadets to keep continuing through the requirements of each achievement.

“I’m very proud of the cadets for taking charge of their promotions and continuing to advance in their respective achievements.  They will all benefit tremendously as they gain new leadership skills and responsibilities, but they serve as role models for the new cadets who are just now being introduced to the program,” Major Pineda said.

The senior members have their own promotions track, each achievement harboring a new set of tasks and a sense of higher responsibility.

Major Christopher Criscuolo has a son at OCS who promoted the same night, and received a challenge coin from Major Pineda.

Captain Christopher Pineda, a former cadet who achieved the highest award within the cadet program, became a senior member and began sharing his knowledge and experience with newer members.

“Stepping into the position of squadron leadership officer as a newly promoted captain gives me a deeper appreciation for what I worked so hard for as a cadet. I’m excited to start working with the cadets from a higher level than I could in the past and help them develop into strong leaders,” Captain Pineda said.

 

OCS looks to shatter more records in 2019, expanding the aerospace education, emergency services, and cadet corps. The squadron is constantly looking to better itself, and its members never settle for anything less than excellence.

 

Omaha Cadet Earns High Honor

Congressman Lee Terry presents Cadet Frazell’s promotion.

Omaha, NE. Cadet Garrett Frazell of Omaha Nebraska has been awarded CAP’s highest Cadet Honor; the General Carl A Spaatz Award.

Cadets qualify for this prestigious award after devoting an average of five years to progress through

sixteen achievements in the CAP Cadet Program. Along the way they develop self-discipline, a strong sense of personal responsibility, the ability to lead and persuade, and the foundation necessary for pursuing a career in aviation, space, or technology. The final step a cadet must complete to earn the Spaatz Award is a rigorous four-part exam consisting of a challenging physical fitness test, an essay exam testing their moral reasoning, a comprehensive written exam on leadership, and a comprehensive written exam on aerospace education. Upon passing the Spaatz Award exams, the cadet is promoted to the grade of cadet colonel.

 

Congressman Lee Terry congratulates Cadet Frazell as NE Wing Commander Daivd Plum Looks on.

Cadet Frazell, a member for almost six years, has availed himself of many of the opportunities afforded him by CAP. He previously was selected to attend the USAF sponsored Undergraduate Pilot Training Familiarization Course and the prestigious National Powered Flight Academy. Frazell is beginning his senior year at Millard West High School. After Graduation he intends to attend Embry Riddle University to study Aerospace engineering and pursue a career a career as an Air Force Pilot. Frazell is the son of Rick & Brenda Frazell also of Omaha.

Cadet Frazell’s Parents “pin on” his Colonel’s insignia as Congressman Terry looks on

Cadet Frazell receivedhis Spaatz Award and promoted to Cadet Colonel on Friday 27 July 2012. The Award was presented by 2nd District Nebraska Congressman Lee Terry. Congressman Terry congratulated Cadet Colonel Garrett Frazell who joins an elite group of fewer than 1900 young men and women that have earned the award since its inception in 1964. Representative Terry stated that THE GENERAL CARL A. SPAATZ AWARD is Civil Air Patrol’s highest cadet honor. It is presented to cadets who have demonstrated excellence in leadership, character, fitness, and aerospace education”.

Also attending the award ceremony were Robert Todd, North Central Region Commander, Col David Plum,Nebraska Wing Commander and Major Tom Pflug,Omaha Composite Squadron Commander; Frazell’s home unit. Col Plum stated: Cadet Frazell joined the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program on his 12th Birthday. He has progressed through the Cadet Training Program in five and one half years to achieve the highest award in the program. Cadet Colonel Frazell joins only 21 other Nebraska Cadets who have earned the Spaatz Award since its inception.

Civil Air Patrol, the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than 61,000 members nationwide, operating a fleet of 550 aircraft. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and was credited by the AFRCC with saving 54 lives in fiscal year 2011. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to nearly 27,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet program. CAP received the World Peace Prize in 2011 and has been performing missions for America for 70 years. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans.

Cadets Fly Airborne Refueling Mission

F-16 in formation with the KC-135 from Nebraska Air National Guard.

Six cadets from The Omaha Composite Squadron of the Nebraska Civil Air Patrol were treated to an up close and personal look at an integral part of America’s aerospace defense recently.  On July 26ththe cadets were treated to an orientation flight aboard a KC 135 from the Nebraska Air National Guard.

 

Cadet Terrence Collins (forground) & Cadet Nathan Pruitt observe an aerial refueling aboard KC 135.

Cadet Pineda observes tanking operations between the KC-135 and an F-16 from the boom operator’s station while flying over South Dakota.

During the two hour refueling mission, the Stratotanker nicknamed “the husker” refueled six F-16s at twenty two thousand feet over Lake Andes South Dakota.  Each Cadet had an opportunity to lay next to the boom operator as he passed three thousand pounds of fuel to a “Fighting Falcon”.  Four of the six cadets also had the chance to ride in the cockpit jump seats during the aircraft’s take off and landing.

 

Civil Air Patrol, the official civilian auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, is a nonprofit organization with more than 61,000 members nationwide, operating a fleet of 550 aircraft, including 6 in Nebraska. CAP, in its Air Force auxiliary role, performs 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and was credited by the AFRCC with saving 54 lives in fiscal year 2011. Its volunteers also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. The members play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to nearly 27,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet program. CAP received the World Peace Prize in 2011 and has been performing missions for America for 70 years. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans.

Cadets Nathan Pruitt, Daniel Mulder,Terrence Collins, Chris Pineda, Micah Holmes, and Nathan Lui aboard a KC 135 “the Husker”.